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This week in OrilliaMatters+: Be head of the class with this great giveaway!

Plus, Scott Sexsmith gets Up Close & Personal with Kim Mitchell
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Ready for the first day of class? Back to school is right around the corner and we want to make the process a little easier, especially on mom and dad’s pocket. Enter for a chance to win a $500 back to school shopping spree! Contest closes August 31st at 11:59pm. Be sure to answer the poll to secure an extra entry. Good luck!

Kim Mitchell

Host Scott Sexsmith is doing his rock and roll duty this week. Check out his one-on-one with Canadian rock icon Kim Mitchell where they discuss his hit songs, Max Webster, going back on tour and his time as a DJ at Q107. If you're looking for more of Up Close & Personal you can check out all of our past episodes.

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Join hosts Scott Sexsmith and Michael Friscolanti and go Inside the Village. You can check out all full length video episodes here. On our latest episode,  the class action lawsuit against Tim Horton's is discussed. Plus, both Frisco and Scott have recently travelled by air and they both share their experiences and compare it to what has been reported. Look for it across the Village Media network, wherever you get your podcasts or get audio only versions here.‚Äč

From the newsroom

Say cheese! Have you checked out The Rind and Truckle in downtown Orillia? The unique shop is definitely worth a visit, Nathan Taylor suggests in his latest food and drink column.

Life-changing events often happen when you least expect it. Check out Jeff Monague’s latest column about a collaboration between local educators, area students and Indigenous promise keepers that prompted the construction of a teaching lodge.